Should Associations Take A Blended Classroom Approach to Instruction?

 

Blended learning first emerged as a buzzword for continuing education professionals more than a decade ago and continues to be considered among the top trends for continuing education programs because of its effectiveness for knowledge delivery and retention. As a result, many associations have implemented a blended learning strategy into their training programs, offering learners the opportunity to access education both in the classroom and through e-learning. Looking forward, there are indications that the conversation is starting to shift from blended learning to blended classroom, and associations may want to take note.

Blended Learning vs. Blended Classroom

Typically, the term “blended learning” is used to describe an approach to training that mixes traditional, classroom-based instruction with online learning modules outside the classroom.  While the use of e-learning tools is a way to extend the learning experience, this traditional approach to blended training may not go far enough to meet the needs of learners—particularly the emerging Generation Z. In response, some organizations, taking a cue from trends within the K-12 learning environment, are focusing on ways to blend multiple learning formats and technologies within a single classroom setting to meet the personalized needs of learners and provide deeper knowledge.

In the most common execution of blended learning, the only component that is truly “blended” is the subject matter. Although complementary, the in-person content is delivered separately, and often in a separate context, from the e-learning modules, which can lead to inconsistencies in both delivery and retention. Additionally, in the traditional approach to blended learning, the classroom content typically takes the form of a lecture, with little opportunity for in-field practical application.

Within a blended classroom, a learner may interact with printed materials, an LMS, mobile content and even virtual and augmented reality technology all as part of a single learning experience. E-learning is no longer a separate activity, but rather, it becomes integrated into the classroom, and vice-versa. The role of the in-person training becomes less about delivering fundamental principles, and more about facilitating a deeper understanding of how to apply the knowledge.

How does this play out in practice?  Here is one example: An instructor may introduce a broad concept using a printed coursebook, then have learners turn to a video or e-learning module to illustrate the concept. The instructor then may incorporate independent study time for participants to use AR and VR tools, e-learning simulations and printed workbook exercises to deliver personalized, hands-on application of the discussed concepts, followed up with group discussions to share experiences and ideas.

Consider a Blended Classroom Approach to Learning for Your Association

While blended learning is a major topic of conversation among adult continuing education and training professionals, the execution of a blended classroom is most commonly found in K-12 and even technical and trade school programs. Which is the very reason associations may want to start thinking about applying it into their continuing education programs. In a few short years, your newest (and youngest) members will be conditioned to expect it.

Use SEO to Increase the ROI of Your Online Conference Materials

 

Perhaps the most valuable asset an association provides to its members is the educational content shared at a conference. In an effort to make that content more accessible, many organizations post their conference materials online. However, often times the content posted is limited to conference attendees who are looking for papers, presentations and handouts from sessions they already attended. While your current conference attendees certainly appreciate this, this limited approach does little to reach new audiences. By incorporating some simple SEO (search engine optimization) tips into your online conference content strategy, associations can drastically increase the role, value and ROI of your conference.

Why SEO for Online Conference Materials Matters

As associations look to increase their relevancy in a world that is changing faster than ever, many are thinking about how to attract and engage younger members. Capitalizing on the younger generation’s tendency to turn to search engines for answers to their most common questions is one logical place to start.

In 2012, the Pew Research Center conducted an online survey of middle and high school teachers to understand which tools were most often used for research projects. 94% of respondents indicated that their students were very likely to use Google as their primary source of research.  Today, these students are the very same Millennials and Gen Z-ers your organization is looking to attract. They are conditioned to turn to search engines like Google for the information and knowledge your association already provides. Learning how to optimize your online conference content so it shows up at the top of search results will help increase your content’s reach and influence, and ultimately your association’s thought leadership and industry influence.

How to Optimize Your Conference Materials for Search: 3 Simple Steps

SEO can often be a daunting task for associations who already have limited internal resources. After all, some large companies dedicate entire teams to the discipline. But, according to Casey Emanuel, Search Optimization Manager at Rocket Clicks, a specialized SEO agency and Premier Google Partner based in Milwaukee, WI, most associations would benefit drastically from adding just a few, simple tasks to their annual conference to-do list.

1. Add Metadata to Your PDFs

Most conference materials—from speaker presentations to handouts—are posted online as PDFs. Emanuel points out that, “just like web pages, you can, and should, optimize PDFs for searchability.” If done correctly, Google will crawl your PDFs for content, and can even display them as organic search results. These steps should only take a few minutes per PDF. To avoid doing all the work yourself, make it a required part of your final submission process.

  • Save the PDF to your website with a descriptive, SEO-friendly filename
  • In Acrobat Reader, go to File > Document Properties and fill in the Title and Subject fields with descriptive text and keywords
  • Optimize the file size by compressing any large images, if necessary

2. Build Quality Backlinks to Your Conference Materials

Backlinks, or references from third-party websites to your own, can serve as a signal of quality and authority to Google. However, Emanuel is quick to point out that, “These links need to be real and authentic, otherwise you could actually be penalized by search engines.”

One fairly easy way to build backlinks to your conference content is to encourage your speakers to reference and link to the material within their own online properties. Not only does this boost SEO for your organization, it also helps the speaker increase their own authority and visibility.

3. Build Internal Links to Your Conference Materials

Oftentimes, the only place you’ll find reference to online conference materials is within the Agenda or Schedule page of the conference website. Emanuel recommends creating follow-up articles or blog posts on popular session topics and incorporating links to the conference materials as part of the article. “These internal links work to build link authority just like backlinks do, helping your PDF files appear in search results for relevant keywords.” To help mitigate additional work, ask your speakers and session leaders to craft the article. They will love the additional exposure, and you’ll have one less post-conference task to complete.

Posting your conference materials online does more than just provide increased choice and accessibility for current attendees. If these materials are search engine optimized, they can deliver valuable answers to new audiences, increasing both the reach and ROI of your conference.

A Lesson on Innovation for Continuing Education Pros

 

Innovation is a concept that is often tossed around a little too freely without much definition of what it really means, or even how to achieve it. In almost every industry, organizations are tasked with finding ways to continually innovate and transform—in the continuing education and training industry, this means continuing to produce innovative educational programming. Without a clear understanding of how to apply such an abstract concept, however, most of us tend to default to focusing improvements on the very concrete, daily tasks in front of us. The opening keynote session at this year’s ICE (Institute for Credentialing Excellence) Exchange Conference led by Dr. Megan Alrutz, encouraged attendees to experiment with the notion of innovation, even if it meant going beyond our comfort zone.

Innovation and Continuing Education Programs: 2018 ICE Exchange Opening Session

The format of Dr. Alrutz’s 2018 ICE Exchange opening session was anything but traditional. Dr. Alrutz directed a group of several hundred continuing education professionals, sitting at tables of 6-10 participants, to discuss thought provoking questions such as:

  • Can you innovate without risk?
  • Can you have safety with innovation?
  • Think about a time in your life when you stepped into the unknown.

She encouraged us to “play in the space that is uncomfortable” and challenge ourselves to grow during these discussions. She compared this “uncomfortable space” or “threshold” to that where the ocean meets the cliffs. This space is not the calm found in the middle of the ocean, nor the solid foundation of cliff formations. The threshold is the place where the energy of the waves challenges the sturdy and majestic cliffside. This is where innovation happens.

As the groups engaged in lively discussion, a very distinguishable buzz and energy permeated the room. This energy continued as everyone came back together for the full-group discussions. As the conversation started to dissipate, a sense of calm washed over the room. It was at this moment that Dr. Alrutz would throw out another question for group discussion, bringing with it the same buzz, followed by calm; buzz, then calm, again and again. The room became a tangible illustration of the very threshold where the ocean meets the cliffs that Dr. Alrutz described earlier. I believe this was her way of demonstrating how innovation is supposed to feel: moments of buzz and chaos, followed by brief moments of calm.

With a clearer understanding of what innovation looks like, the next challenge is how to make it happen. What do you need to do to step into the threshold of innovation? According to Dr. Alrutz, there are two simple commitments each of us needs to make:

  1. Bring yourself fully
  2. Challenge yourself to take a risk

If you can find small moments throughout your day to incorporate these two commitments, even while tackling your daily to-do list, you’ll be on a path to innovation without even realizing it.

Conference Planners: Take Our State of the Conference Industry Survey

 

Our annual State of the Conference Industry survey is now open, and we need your input!

Each year for the past five years, Omnipress collects data from conference planners and association professionals to better understand trends surrounding conference content, including how attendees want to receive content, how associations provide it, and what changes lie ahead as demographics and preferences change. We use the survey data collected to publish our annual State of the Conference Industry Report, which will be released in January 2019.

Our goal with this report is to provide peer-to-peer benchmarking, as well as ideas and trends you can use in your planning sessions.

Omnipress Annual State of The Conference Industry Report

For instance, in the 2018 State of the Conference Industry Report, we saw a notable increase in the percentage of associations that are re-using their content beyond the conference. Associations are not only using content to promote their events, but they are also reusing it in order to reinforce learning after the event and to attract prospective members to the organization.

Additionally, meeting planners face an increasing challenge of trying to balance the diverse needs and preferences of a multi-generational audience, particularly as many organizations have not yet defined their plans to address the needs of younger members.

2019 Conference Industry Trends and Insights

What insights will we gain in 2019? We need you to help us determine that, and would love to have your voice included in this year’s results! The survey takes just 5-10 minutes to complete. All responses remain confidential for the report. As a thank you for your time, you can choose to be entered into a drawing to receive a $100 Visa Gift Card.

Please take a moment to complete the survey and to pass it along to your colleagues as well. We look forward to sharing the results with you in early 2019.

Training Course Materials Can Impact Your Brand Image

 

“Brand” is a term that is often associated with how a company presents itself graphically. In reality, a brand is much bigger and more important than a logo or font choice.

For an organization, brand is the experience they promise to deliver to their customers or members. From a customer’s perspective, brand is the impression left upon them of how well an organization delivered on its promise. This impression is formed based on every interaction they have with an organization and its products—including printed course materials. For a new, prospective learner, are your training materials an adequate reflection of the quality and value of your programs?

If you’re unsure, you’re certainly not alone. Many associations are challenged with growing their continuing education programs and increasing performance, leaving few resources available to overhaul the design and structure of their training course books.

Our customer, the National Retail Federation Foundation (NRFF), found themselves in a similar position. One of their primary course books did not provide an optimal experience for instructors and learners. What they found, however, is that by investing the time to make the necessary changes, they helped make their course more marketable, and more valuable to their learners. NRFF was able to accomplish their goals by focusing on three main objectives:

  • Rewrite the book for more robust content which allowed students to choose self-study or instructor-led sessions
  • Ensure core content matches between both instructor and student materials
  • Implement design and print quality that enhances the learning materials, and ultimately, their brand

You can read more about their story here.

Today, associations are challenged with remaining relevant to a changing member base, at a time when educational content can be accessed with a simple online search. Your brand needs to portray your organization as the authoritative voice in your industry, and then deliver on it via every touch point (including training course materials!) you have with current, new, and prospective members.

[SURVEY RESULTS] Training Professionals: What Are Your Go-To Resources?

 

A few weeks ago we surveyed continuing education and training professionals to learn more about which resources they turn to for ideas, inspiration and information on trending topics such as micro-learning, blended learning and getting ready for Generation Z. This survey was conducted as a response to what we’ve been hearing from our friends and customers in the industry—that there isn’t a centralized resource specifically for those working within associations.

So where do CE professionals gather online and in person? As expected, in a variety of places. Some are more vertical-centric, while others are geared more toward the corporate training industry, but provide best practices that can be applied across all organization types. There were certainly resources mentioned that we are very familiar with, and others that were completely new to us.

Here is a summary of the results:

A majority of the respondents serve in leadership roles at associations.

We provided a list of the more well-known conferences designed for Training and Education leaders  to choose from. Turns out, our respondents don’t actually attend many of them.  The top conferences attended include the ASAE Annual Meeting and the Association for Talent Development (ATD) International Conference and Exposition.  There were quite a few singular answers provided in the “Other” category, demonstrating just how fractionalized the resource landscape is. Some of the “other” answers provided include:

We then gave the respondents an opportunity to list any and all of the online industry resources (newsletters, blogs, webinars, etc.) they find to be the most valuable for keeping up with trends and best practices. Once again, the answers given were all over the board.

The top online resources include:

Honorable mentions also go to the following:

A number of respondents also mentioned they look for ideas in LinkedIn discussion boards, through discussions with other associations, peers and vendors.

Several times, respondents took the opportunity to tell us they didn’t feel there was a “perfect fit” resource within the industry.

It’s not surprising, then, that respondents overwhelmingly indicated they would be interested in attending more peer-to-peer learning opportunities for association-based continuing education and training professionals, if they were available.

It’s clear that with so many potential resources available, many of which don’t quite get to the core of challenges and opportunities specifically for associations, education and training professionals find it worthwhile to have more opportunities to learn from each other, in both formal and informal settings. Perhaps this will be the start of a larger grassroots movement to make that happen.

CE Professionals: What Are Your Go-To Resources? Take Our Quick Poll

In the past few weeks we’ve heard from several continuing education and training professionals who are looking for more opportunities to hear how other organizations are tackling key issues such as micro-learning, online and mobile content, gamification and blended learning. While there are a variety of resources that provide information, there does not appear to be a centralized source of ideas and networking for those that develop and deliver continuing education and credentialing programs. This piqued our curiosity.  So we’d like to hear from you!

We’ve developed a very quick survey for individuals who develop, manage and implement training, education and credentialing programs for associations and other organizations. We’d like to know where you go to gather ideas and best practices from your peers. The survey will take less than five minutes to complete, and we’ll be sure to share the results.

Take the poll

What’s the Deal with All These Acronyms? My Introduction to the Association World

The following is a special post from Brooke Rossi, our summer Marketing Intern. Brooke is starting her senior year at the University of Wisconsin-Stout, majoring in Professional Communication and Emerging Media. Before returning to school, Brooke agreed to share her thoughts and impressions of associations as a soon-to-be graduate entering the professional world.

Before starting my summer Marketing Internship at Omnipress, I had very little knowledge of associations. My initial impression was that people typically joined them through their workplace with little enthusiasm and only for some level of prestige that comes with membership. I thought there were a limited variety of associations to join, focusing on broad disciplines, and didn’t realize how expansive (and specialized) the association universe is. Just four months ago, I wouldn’t have thought about associations and their impact on nearly every aspect of local and global societies. Without an understanding of the association world, I wasn’t even aware of the extent of educational and advancement opportunities available through education, credentialing and industry-related certifications. Real change happens because of associations, and I was completely blind to it!

WSAADTATYP? (What Should An Association Do to Appeal to Young Professionals?)

Now that I’ve had the chance to work in an organization that caters to associations, I have a greater appreciation and understanding of why they exist and why they’re so important. And I’m so glad I do! I am already looking into associations that touch my field of study. I wondered how many of my peers—students getting ready to enter the workforce—shared my same level of appreciation and understanding. I reached out to several friends to see what they knew, and whether associations were even on their radar. Most had given associations very little thought. Once I explained some of what I had learned, many of them indicated they would consider joining a professional association after graduation specifically for the continued education and networking opportunities. Associations: this means there is a huge opportunity to get in front of young professionals much, much earlier in the process, and to do a better job explaining what you do and you can offer us. You also need to help remove some of the inherent barriers that will prevent us from pulling the trigger. Here are just a few ideas for you to consider when looking for ways to engage more young professionals.

Set Up Early Outreach Programs

As I quickly learned from surveying my own peer group, many young professionals aren’t seeking out associations. To start enticing new professionals who do not yet know about you, visit them before they even graduate. Look for universities with corresponding degrees and create on-campus events and programming geared toward students entering the profession. Or, participate in existing events such as an on-site career fair. I know that any time I attend an event on campus related to my degree, it makes me more excited to get out and pursue a career, and knowing that I would already have a community to ease that transition would energize me more.

Create a Newbie-Friendly Environment

To recent graduates, joining a group of seasoned, industry veterans can be intimidating. Consider providing onboarding programs designed to increase our comfort level. This could mean an exclusive get-together for new members to make initial connections, or a mentorship program to connect a new member with a young professional ambassador—someone who has a few years of membership under their belt, but has been in our shoes recently enough and can show us the ropes.

Market to Our Thrifty Buying Habits

In order to appeal to young professionals entering the workforce, you will want to think about the average financial situation graduates face. With our search for work and a place to live, along with possible college debt, we often think there is nothing left in our wallets for a membership to your association. Throughout the years, I have noticed that my peers are easily deterred by price. We tend to be more frugal with our money, and are hesitant to make purchases that require a large upfront investment. Consider offering a special rate for new graduates, or give us a 90-day free trial for your organization. When we are ready to pull the trigger, provide ways to spread out the cost of membership over a longer period of time, such as monthly billing.

Help Us Grow and Be Adventurous

Opportunities for growth and adventure are valued by young professionals like me. Don’t be too subtle about your benefits of membership. In fact, flaunt them! But make sure they are tailored to where we are in our careers. Emphasize how your certifications and other recognition will help us “climb the ladder” or teach us how to become an effective leader. Or for more of a fun twist, tell us about the fun destinations you can help send us to. We are seeing our friends travel the world on social media, and we do not want to miss out. Giving us an outlet where we can both learn and explore is icing on the cake.

Invest in Your Content

Another thing you will want to think about when looking to gain young members is that we are accustomed to finding information quickly, with just one or two clicks. So having a strong online presence is crucial. But it also has to feature an exceptional user experience. First, you have to make sure I find you. When I do, feature content that immediately provides quality, relevant answers to my most pressing questions. Not sure where to start? Reach out and ask us! Use the channels we already frequent, such as YouTube, Snapchat and Instagram. We are more than happy to tell you what’s on our minds.

Young Professionals Need Your Association…We Just Don’t Know it Yet!

Associations provide the learning and development opportunities young professionals crave. But you can’t take for granted that we’ll figure this out immediately upon graduation. We first need to understand what associations are and why they exist before we even consider joining one. Then, we need to have a firm understanding of what your association can do for me, while making membership as easy as possible. Do whatever you can to remove the barriers to membership, whether real (financial) or perceived. If you make a genuine commitment to us, the good news is you’ll have gained life-long learners who would love to advocate on your behalf, further spreading your mission to professionals that don’t know they need you yet.

Applying Micro-Learning Concepts to Your Printed Course Materials

 

In an earlier post, we discussed how micro-learning—or “the delivery of bite-sized content nuggets”— is considered to be the #1 trend for training professionals in 2018. But this doesn’t mean it’s being widely executed. While some organizations are starting to experiment with their offerings, most are still figuring out how to get started.

The discussion of micro-learning is typically centered around online and mobile-based training programs, which, according to recently-compiled data from a series of industry studies, is one of the primary reasons that the implementation of micro-learning programs isn’t as widespread as you would think. Continuing education professionals stated that the time investment required to create online and mobile-friendly content is a major barrier, particularly for those who are already tasked with growing their programs using the same or fewer resources. Meanwhile, according to the same series of studies, nearly three-fourths of participants provide printed training materials. If there is a clear, strategic benefit for your organization to create programs that consist of smaller learning segments, it may be possible to pilot a program by re-thinking how you present your print-based content.

Historically, course books and training manuals have been designed to support long-form learning, organizing content into longer chapters that both introduce complex concepts and dive into all of the supporting details.  Recently, however, some organizations have started looking at ways to redesign existing content in order to serve up the same information smaller pieces that can be consumed and referenced much more quickly. Here are just a few ideas to consider:

From One to Many

Take a large, single course book and break it out into a branded series of separate pieces that are each more singularly focused.  In doing this, you may have room to play with the format and add notetaking pages or other self-reflection and application exercises to make the content more personally relevant.

Keep Sections Short

If you determine that offering a single course book is the best way to deliver your program, consider reducing the length of your chapters and sections, providing more frequent breaks in the material so readers have a logical place to pause and digest.

Turn Text into Graphics

If you are outlining list-based information, try substituting pages of text with a simple-to-follow infographic to help increase retention.

Provide Easy Access to Supplemental Digital Material

Most of us are never more than an arm’s length from our phones or other mobile devices at all times. Rather than presenting all of the necessary information in your printed piece, consider using print as a means to give a more concise overview or introduction of a topic, with directions throughout the piece to supplemental online materials from your organization or your industry’s thought-leaders, including videos, podcasts and virtual renderings that can be accessed while the learner is reading.

If you are looking to incorporate micro-learning practices into your existing continuing education programs but don’t feel you have the time or resources to develop online and mobile-friendly content, consider starting with your printed materials. This not only gives you an opportunity to take a fresh look at existing content, but is also a lower-cost way to test-pilot micro-learning techniques before making a larger investment in new, digital materials.

Omnipress Forges Industry Partnerships to Help More Meeting Planners

 

In an earlier post, I mentioned that this was going to be a big year for our CATALYST online abstract management system, as we maintain a strong focus on ongoing product development, industry partnerships and third-party integrations. We have been doing a lot of work behind-the-scenes that I’m very happy to share with all of you.

Partnerships and Integrations

Omnipress has secured several industry partnerships that help to make CATALYST even more accessible to meeting planners who are looking to simplify their next call for abstracts, including:

  • Community Brands – Tech Partner
  • Conference Direct – Preferred Supplier
  • ACGI/Association Anywhere – Resource Partner
  • Fuzion — Network Member

We are also actively integrating CATALYST with other event tech and association platforms, including many of the leading AMS providers to provide a more seamless user experience.

Product Updates

Over the past several months, we have launched dozens of new features and updates that further increase data integrity, provide even more flexibility for meeting planners, and provide an even better experience for end users. Just a few of the highlights include:

  • More advanced review assignment rules so meeting planners can easily implement a variety of options within the same collection
  • Even greater flexibility filtering data and configuring reports to fit your needs, reducing or eliminating the need to spend time manually re-working spreadsheets
  • More robust schedule conflict detection
  • Ability to collect payments in CATALYST, with 100% of the collected revenue going directly to your organization’s account
  • Integration with iThenticate/CrossCheck Plagiarism Detection Software to help uphold the integrity of your submissions

Future Product Roadmap

Even with all of these advancements, we continue to work toward our goal of ensuring CATALYST sets the industry standard for online abstract and speaker management. Today, we’re currently working on strengthening the integration from CATALYST to your conference material outputs so it’s even easier for you to get that content into your attendees’ hands. Watch for more information on that to be released later this year.

For over 40 years, our single focus has been to help associations and other organizations simplify the process of collecting, producing and distributing educational content. The investments we continue to make are with the sole purpose to continue this mission.

Walking in a Customer’s Shoes…30,000 Steps at a Time

 

Last week I spent some time in our order fulfillment warehouse, just as I do every week, observing and listening. It’s incredible to watch the team manage an order—from picking, kitting, packing and shipping—with such smooth coordination, like a symphony of movement. And then it dawned on me: our staff is in a state of near constant motion. How many steps do we take each day on behalf of customers? Thanks to the miracle of wearable technology, I was able to calculate the answer.

Our team of fulfillment professionals accumulates an average of 30,000 steps per day. That equates to 7.5 million steps over the course of a year, or approximately 3,750 miles! We are essentially walking from New York to Los Angeles (with over 1,000 miles to spare) each year so our customers don’t have to.

If you’re a Training and Education professional who is tasked with handling your own order fulfillment, how far are you (or your team) “traveling” each year, in an effort to serve your members and learners? How much energy are you expending on non-mission centric tasks such as packing student handbooks, tent cards, pens, and supplement study materials into boxes, and then having to track all the shipments? Not to mention the continuous process of managing the remaining inventory. What if you could re-allocate your time and resources to initiatives that grow your programs, elevate your brand and improve the experience for your learners?

Our customers know that we’ll travel to the moon and back to make sure their course materials are delivered accurately and on time. And now we have the data to prove that we truly will.

Now Available: Best Practices Guide for High-Quality Conference Content

 

By far the #1 reason individuals choose to attend a conference is the quality of the educational programming. Sourcing that content is consistently reported to be a top challenge for meeting planners—from setting up and advertising the open call for abstract submissions, to chasing down submitters and reviewers, to manually re-working and cleaning-up back-end data and reports. These barriers not only take up a disproportionate amount of time for meeting planners, but they can also affect the quantity and quality of submissions. Making seemingly small changes to your abstract management and review process can help you mitigate problems, save time and simplify the development of your conference materials.

Download the guide to learn:

  • How to collect the right amount of data, at the right time
  • How to test your system to avoid unforeseen technical issues
  • Why you should consider including steps to authenticate each submitter’s content
  • Why it’s important to create a “database of record”

Featured Recommendation: Collect data in small pieces

The information you collect from submitters will eventually be pushed to a variety of conference materials, from a printed program book, to online conference materials and perhaps even a conference app—each of which has different formatting requirements. To give you the greatest amount of flexibility without having to manually cleanup and re-format data, set up your submission fields to collect data in the smallest pieces possible. For instance, break out the Name field into First Name, Last Name, Suffix and Credentials.

Read the full guide for more tips on how to better collect and manage high-quality content.

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