How to Build a Conference Call for Papers That Is Flexible During Uncertain Times

Earlier this year, meeting planners indicated they were cautiously optimistic for the return to in-person events—either fully in-person or as part of a hybrid solution— by this fall. In fact, this Q2 survey of event planners by EventMB shows that at the time, 70% were planning an in-person event with over half of those events occurring before the end of this year.

But the newest data and health recommendations are causing some to re-think their event plans.

Facing increased uncertainty once again, meeting professionals may be forced to adjust their conference format and program not just because of potential local restrictions or changing attendee preferences but also based on the willingness and ability of speakers to travel to an in-person event.

If you’re using an abstract management system to conduct your call for papers, posters, or speakers, there are several steps you should take during your initial call that will make it easier to make future adjustments to your program schedule and session content if necessary.

  1. Proactively manage your speaker preferences

    As part of your submission form, be sure to ask potential speakers whether they are willing to deliver their session content in-person or virtually, and/or whether the content being delivered works best for an in-person or virtual audience. That way, if things need to change, you already have reportable data on which speakers you can ultimately select based on the final conference format, rather than going back and collecting this information after the fact.

  2. Collect all speaker assets early, and in multiple formats

    As part of your initial call, include a place for session presenters to supply everything you will need for your final event materials, including headshots, bios, and other supplementary materials. Ask for these files to be provided in formats that will work well across print, online, and mobile. That way, regardless of how attendees access the conference schedule and session information, you’re already covered.

  3. Consider video as part of the initial submission process

    Abstracts and presentation proposals are used to judge the quality and relevance of the suggested topic. But it’s also important to know whether the speaker can present the information in a compelling and engaging way. It’s also never a bad idea to use video to “audition” your speakers—even for an in-person event. However, this audition process becomes even more important in a virtual setting where it can be harder to hold the audience’s attention.  Have your speakers submit a short (1-2 minute) video of themselves delivering a portion of the presentation during your initial call for presentations. Some abstract management platforms even feature a built-in video recording tool to make the process easier.  And later, if you do need to offer pre-recorded, on-demand session content as part of your virtual or hybrid event, speakers can use this same tool to record and submit their final presentations.

  4. Leverage the built-in scheduling tool

    Many meeting planners use a series of spreadsheets to build their conference schedule which makes changes to speakers or sessions extremely time-consuming. If your abstract management software includes a built-in electronic scheduling tool, now is the time to take advantage of it! Using this tool, you can easily pull in accepted papers, posters, and presentations, drag-and-drop them into the schedule, and see flagged conflicts at a glance. Not only does this make it significantly easier to build an initial schedule, but it also saves a lot of time and potential errors if you need to manage last-minute changes.

The current pandemic, it appears, will continue to affect conferences longer than many of us anticipated. Just a few months ago, a return to in-person events in the fall and winter, even in a modified format, felt like a relatively safe bet. But may meeting planners have started to take pause and reassess the best way to proceed without knowing whether and how health and safety guidelines will continue to change.

Given this uncertainty, it’s even more important to take steps early on in the conference planning process—including during your initial call for presentations—that provide greater flexibility down the road.

4 Ways to Use Video to Enhance Your Virtual Event

Many conference organizers have historically relied on third-party tools such as an abstract management system to collect, review, select, and schedule papers and presentations for an in-person event. What’s not as widely known is this same software can also be used in non-traditional ways to better support your virtual or hybrid event.

If your abstract management system features a built-in video recording and submission tool, like our CATALYST abstract management software does, you can easily collect pre-recorded session videos to be included in your event schedule. What’s more, these same video capture capabilities can be leveraged in other ways to enhance the event experience for your speakers, attendees, and sponsors.

Here are four ways meeting planners are using video that go beyond just capturing session content:

1. Audition your virtual speakers

Giving a presentation to a virtual audience requires a very special skill set. Understanding how to present the material in a way that is engaging without being able to use movement can be challenging. Some presenters really rely on audience feedback—eye contact, smiles, laughs, nods—to maintain their energy level and enthusiasm.

To ensure that your speakers are not only presenting relevant, high-quality content, but that they can carry a 30-to-60-minute virtual presentation, consider having them use your abstract management tool to record and provide a short audition video as part of your initial submission process, and include them in your review criteria. You can even provide the ability for your reviewers to leave feedback for submitters so they can make improvements before the final presentation.

2. Perform a presentation test-run before the event

Ask your selected speakers to create a test recording of a short portion of their presentation in your abstract management system to confirm their A/V setup is sufficient. Items to check include quality and sharpness of their camera, whether the audio works and is loud enough, lighting, and background. That way, they can address any potential issues well ahead of the event.

3. Gather videos for event marketing

At some point between when your speakers are selected and when you prepare content for your virtual event platform, you’ll need to collect additional information from your speakers such as headshots and bios. This is also a perfect opportunity to have your speakers and session leaders use your abstract management software to record and submit short intro videos that can be used on your website and social media channels to promote the event.

4. Gather videos from sponsors and exhibitors

Your sponsors and exhibitors want as much opportunity as possible to get their message in front of attendees. Pre-recorded videos are great to feature on your virtual event platform and to promote premier sponsors and exhibitors on your website and social media channels. But not all sponsors and exhibitors will have a pre-produced video. If this is the case, a company representative can easily use your abstract management system’s built-in video recording and submission tool to record a short message that is personalized to your attendees. It’s an easy, low-cost solution that provides increased exposure and value.

While the format of events has changed, the need to source high-quality content hasn’t. But in a virtual setting, that definition of “quality” extends beyond the subject matter. The presentation style of the speaker and the technical quality matter too. Pre-recorded videos can help you minimize issues for your virtual attendees before the event begins. They can also provide opportunities to create a better experience for your speakers, sponsors, and exhibitors.

Virtual Event Platform Comparison: A Needs Assessment

While the calendar shows that 2020 is behind us, uncertainty surrounding the timing of in-person events is not. The common belief is that in-person conferences could return at some point during the second half of the year. But exactly when, and at what capacity, is still unknown.

As meeting professionals plan for either a full or partial virtual event in 2021, they are faced with the daunting task of assessing and selecting a virtual event platform in a marketplace that has expanded tenfold since the pandemic began less than a year ago.

Got Demo Fatigue From Virtual Event Platform Comparison?

According to one association-based meetings manager, “I’m completely overwhelmed by the options, and honestly, the demos start to blur together.”

Sound familiar? If so, you’re not alone. Demo fatigue is real, especially when you’re trying to select a platform that fits within your budget, is manageable for your team, and meets the needs of a diverse set of attendees, exhibitors, and sponsors.

Identify Your Organization’s Platform Needs With This Worksheet

To make it easier to narrow in on the best solution for your event, we’ve created this handy Virtual Event Platform Needs Assessment Worksheet.

Before you schedule any product demos, take some time to think about and document your answers to the six questions outlined in this worksheet. Taking this time will accomplish several key things:

  1. Completing it ahead of the demo not only gives you a more finely tuned checklist of requirements to evaluate but also ensures the rest of your planning team is aligned early in the process.
  2. It’s easy to be “wowed” by features that are fun and interesting but provide minimal added value to your event. Our worksheet will help you separate and prioritize must-have vs. nice-to-have features.
  3. Providing this information to your potential vendor partners helps them deliver a more personalized and relevant product demo so you can spend your limited time on features and functionality that actually matter to you.

Download the worksheet

Whether you’re thinking about featuring a simple agenda with a few session links on our own website or are looking for an end-to-end, immersive virtual experience, using our worksheet to organize and prioritize your needs and requirements will make it easier to navigate your options.

Virtual Events: Practical Advice from an Attendee

Over the past few weeks, the conversation among meeting planners has shifted from whether to go virtual to how to go virtual with their conference.

  • How do you schedule your event?
  • How do you deliver the content?
  • How do you connect attendees?

These questions have meeting planners considering whether to design their virtual conference as a live (livestream) event, or to provide attendees with on-demand access to content. Or, a little of both.

Ultimately, we’re all trying to figure out how to replicate the best parts of an in-person event within a virtual environment. Hint: you can’t replicate it, but you can reinvent it.

Reinventing your in-person conference as a virtual event

To have a successful virtual conference, you need to truly understand what the life of a virtual participant looks like right now so you know what you can—and can’t—expect of them.

Normally, we don’t make our blog posts quite so personal. But this time, I’m going to get a little personal and share the first-hand wisdom I’ve gathered over the past week while my husband attended a three-day, all-day virtual event. Spoiler alert: while he absolutely loved the content and discussions with his peers, some of the logistics were both painful and funny (after the fact, of course).

A personal account of a virtual event experience

Typically at a conference, we’re more focused on the professional backgrounds of our attendees. But with so much of the population working from home, we must take into consideration their personal lives as well. Here’s what happened in my situation.

Both my husband and I work full time and have both been working from home since mid-March. We are lucky that we have the tools and tech that allow us to work effectively: multiple monitors, great bandwidth, dedicated working spaces. We also have two tween/teen children who, although self-sufficient, are starting to become emotionally spent from the new limitations that have been placed on their lives. We also have two large dogs who are continually confused by why we are all home and why we are not paying more attention to them.

So what did attending a 3-day live virtual event look like in our household?

First, technology was not kind to us

Do you have any idea what having one person participate in a live video event all day does to the bandwidth in the house? The effects were immediate and dramatic. I had to take my Microsoft Teams meetings from the app on my phone, not my computer, with the wi-fi turned off. The kids were booted out of their online schoolwork and from their Facetime sessions with friends. Admittedly, much cursing occurred.

My husband, who was both an attendee and a speaker at this event, was in the middle of his presentation when one of the primary internet service providers in our area had two routers fail. He wasn’t prepped for any backup plan ahead of time, so he was scrambling to get the live streaming app downloaded to his phone. 30 minutes later he was back online, with just enough time to give an abrupt wrap-up. Things happen. They really do. To prove this point further, this is the same week that, back at the Omnipress offices where only a small staff remains on-site, a squirrel took out the power and internet for several hours. No joke. And while this had no effect on my husband, it only illustrates that technology will fail at some point, for someone. And there’s nothing you can do about it.

Tuning in (and tuning out) from a busy household

When you attend an in-person conference you’re away from the office, away from home, and away from the usual daily distractions, minus an urgent email here and there. With a virtual event, however, there is no mental or physical separation from work and home. You can’t delegate your spouse to deal with a vomiting dog, a kiddo who is frustrated with their math exercise, an impromptu 8th-grade graduation parade through the neighborhood (horns blazing, of course), or the UPS driver making his third delivery to your house that day, because she’s also on an important call!

The bottom line: it’s unrealistic to think that your attendees can dedicate significant amounts of focused, uninterrupted time to your event. As hard as they may try, life gets in the way.

A virtual group conversation is harder to navigate

Networking can sometimes be awkward, at best. Recently I’ve done several virtual happy hours with close friends and I find those to be more difficult and challenging than meeting up in person. Screens freeze up intermittently or people accidentally talk over each other which affects how naturally the conversation flows. But we manage because we know each other so well.

Now try doing the same thing with a group of strangers, especially if you’re more of an introvert, like my husband. Oh, he can fake his way through “forced” social events with the best of them, but he certainly doesn’t prefer it.

His event had several different networking opportunities built into the agenda. Some were unstructured happy hours and some were scheduled in-between sessions (ouch!). Others consisted of smaller collaboration groups, which he felt were the most beneficial and effective to establish a genuine connection with a group of people who rallied around a common set of challenges. It also helped when the virtual networking events were scheduled earlier in the day when his brain was fresh and he could absorb more of the educational content.

What did we take away from this experience?

I’ve lived in the association event space for more than a decade, so when I heard my husband was going to be participating in a three-day virtual event, I watched more closely than most spouses probably would. Putting on both my event planner and attendee hat, here’s the most important thing I learned:

An event that combines both live and pre-recorded content provides the best attendee experienceand the most room to get creative!

1. Making your content available on-demand is crucial

Give your attendees a way to access session content anytime. This not only helps to reinforce learning, but it also serves as a safety net if technology fails or life happens. Make sure all your presentations—even the live ones—are recorded and available in a way that is easy to search for and navigate, along with all related session materials. This also takes some of the pressure off your speakers and their tech.

2. If you’re going to livestream, be selective

While presenting sessions live creates a sense of excitement and FOMO (Fear of Missing Out), it doesn’t work for all attendees, especially those in different time zones. And it’s definitely difficult to manage as an  all-day event. Save the live streaming for the most popular portions of your conference, such as a keynote session.

3. There are many effective ways to craft a successful live/recorded blended event

As one example, you can “fake” a live experience by releasing pre-recorded content on a timed basis and hyping up the countdown on your event marketing channels. Follow this release with live, small-group discussion sessions around that content to create a sense of urgency for participants to view the content.

This also helps to create those more structured and deliberate networking conversations among attendees that tend to be more meaningful. This blended approach also makes it easier to program natural breaks in the agenda for your attendees to address everything else that’s currently happening in the background of their lives.

How Should You Serve-Up Your On-Demand Event Content?

Join us for a live, 30-minute webinar on Thursday, May 28th, where we’ll take a tour of the Omnipress Virtual Conference & Event Platform. It’s a simple and cost-effective way to serve-up on-demand content for your conference. And yes, it will be recorded and available on-demand in case you can’t join us!

Turn Virtual Events into a Year-Round Learning and Engagement Strategy

With the cancellation of spring conferences and the fate of summer and fall events still up in the air, we’re tasked with figuring out how to turn in-person conferences into successful virtual events—whether that means live-streaming sessions, providing on-demand access to pre-recorded sessions, or a mix of both.

Whatever strategy you choose, we believe there is a broader consideration to make: how can you use this new opportunity to utilize the virtual event content you and your speakers create to turn your online conference in a year-round learning and engagement opportunity?

Event Content Must Serve a Higher Purpose For Attendees and the Organization

Our 2020 State of the Conference Industry Report, which was developed and released before COVID-19 became a major disruptor, indicates that to achieve growth and success in 2020 and beyond, the content sourced and shared at a conference will need to serve a purpose beyond simply marketing next year’s event.

There is a significant opportunity to re-purpose and re-package this content not just to reach new audiences, but to reinforce key learning concepts, facilitate ongoing peer connections, and provide more value to members.

At the time that respondents were surveyed in late 2019, more meeting planners indicated they were starting to re-use conference session content to promote learning retention. But they also stated this was one of their top challenges because many did not have the tools, platforms, or processes in place to fully support this strategy.

Reworking Your Conference Strategy for Virtual Events

While the sudden need to go virtual with conferences has created substantial challenges, it has also opened the door to new opportunities. A virtual conference may not carry the same perceived value to attendees, exhibitors, and sponsors. And practically speaking, it doesn’t work well being delivered in the same timeframe of the in-person event.

In order to retain registration fees and sponsor dollars, you already need to rethink how the conference is delivered. Why limit your timeframe to just a few days or a few weeks? Why not use this as a chance to create a must-see event throughout the year.

Here are a few ideas to help get the wheels spinning:

If your event is going fully virtual:

  • Use the initial timeframe of the in-person conference to feature live (virtual) sessions from keynote speakers and plenary sessions
  • Have your session speakers and paper or poster presenters pre-record their sessions, which you can then release on a timed basis over the course of several weeks
  • Create a series of both live (virtual) and on-demand follow-up sessions that attendees pre-register and potentially pay for. These sessions could allow them to dive deeper into a sub-topic, participate in a discussion group with the presenter, or even allow them to share challenges and on-the-job “a-ha” moments with each other as they attempt to put these learnings into practice
  • These sessions can be hosted by an exhibitor or sponsor; or, you can work with your sponsors to develop additional live and on-demand educational content

If your conference is a blended event (both live and virtual options):

  • Much of the same ideas still apply! Use your virtual platforms to deliver follow-up content and provide additional learning, networking, and sharing opportunities throughout the year

We hope this current pandemic will soon be a distant memory. But even when that happens, there is a good chance that the format of conferences will be forever changed, with more organizations creating a virtual component to a live event.

Don’t limit yourself just to the conference itself. Use this as a springboard to deliver year-round learning and peer connections, while creating potential new streams of non-dues revenue.

Omnipress 2020: Continuous Tech Improvement for Meeting Planners

2019 was both an exciting and challenging year for both meeting professionals and Omnipress. Overall, the meetings industry saw steady growth, with many organizations reporting at least modest increases in attendance. Meeting planners continued to experiment with the event format to offer more collaborative and personalized learning for attendees. They also continued to embrace event technology to streamline operations, gather better data, and elevate the attendee experience.

While the growth of new event technology options provides tremendous opportunities for association conferences, it also presents some challenges—namely, how to select the best tech from the ever-growing list of options. Not to mention getting their tech stack to work together seamlessly,  making the most of a busy schedule with limited time.

Omnipress Expanded Event Technology Offerings in 2019

In 2019, Omnipress continued to invest heavily in product development to provide event technology tools that integrate seamlessly, while providing an exceptional experience for meeting planners and end-users. Some highlights from the year include:

    • Launched a new role-based user dashboard for our CATALYST® Abstract Management Software that provides more useful at-a-glance information for submitters, reviewers, and event administrators
    • Increased the functionality of the conference scheduling tool within CATALYST to make it even easier for meeting planners to create a complete conference agenda that manages speakers, sessions, and schedule conflicts
    • Expanded our external integrations for CATALYST, including YourMembership® and Abila® association management systems, Attendify® mobile event app, iThenticate® plagiarism detection software, and the IEEE Xplore Digital Library®
    • Enhanced the integration within our own tech stack so meeting planners can easily publish their conference schedule right from CATALYST to an online event schedule and the mobile event app.

Take a 30-minute tour new product features

Sign up for our Omnipress January 2020 Product Update Webinar

In 2020, the momentum will continue with even more product updates to help meeting planners access and leverage meaningful data to make even better decisions, streamline operations, and enhance learning before, during, and after the conference.

We will also maintain the ongoing investment in our people and processes so Omnipress can continue to provide unrivaled one-on-one guidance and support from experts who have worked on thousands of conferences.

Omnipress has always been more than just an event tech company and print provider. We’ve been working alongside associations for more than forty years. We understand the important role education plays in fulfilling your mission. This is why our mission has always been to make it easier for you to deliver educational materials to your members, attendees, and learners—regardless of the tools being used. In 2020, we will continue our commitment to providing products and services that meet the evolving needs of association professionals.

Association Growth: Conference and Membership Teams Must Collaborate Better

 

Earlier this year, we published our annual State of the Conference Industry Report which tracks the evolution of conference content and the role it plays at an annual conference.  While there are several key takeaways and opportunities highlighted in the report, there is one that association leaders should take particular note of: to achieve association growth goals, conference and membership teams need to collaborate more.

The link between conference attendance and association membership

Since the report was first published in 2015, meeting planners have consistently indicated that their top goal for the annual conference is to increase attendance. However, the data also demonstrates that conference attendance trends and membership growth trends are closely linked.

For the meeting planner, an increase in association membership provides a larger pool of prospective conference attendees. Conversely, for the membership team, the annual conference provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate the association’s value to a prospective member before they make an annual commitment to the organization. The conference is often the primary way a member stays connected to and engaged with the organization, which helps to promote member retention.

As you’re getting ready for your next conference, consider ways to more tightly connect the value of the conference with the value of membership to increase conference attendance, grow membership and create more engaged members.

Here are a few ideas to help get you started:

  1. Experiment with creative pricing strategies

One local chapter of the American Marketing Association (AMA) generated a significant spike in new memberships when their annual conference registration opened. The reason? They created a conference pricing structure that made it more lucrative to attend as a member, plus bundled the pricing with a limited-time discount on membership fees. Because the chapter has a strong member retention rate, the initial discounts created a long-term return on investment.

  1. Create unique member benefits through post-conference programming

The meeting planner looks for ways to extend the conference experience long after the closing keynote session. The membership team looks for ways to increase the value of membership. By providing exclusive access to post-conference programming, associations can achieve both.  One idea: host small, post-show virtual discussion groups for attendees to share ideas, apply learning on the job and connect with peers. Social platforms such as House Party, FaceTime, Workplace by Facebook and Google Hangouts are low-to-no cost tools that can help facilitate this.

  1. Use the conference as a forum to connect with members

Unless your association has local chapters or sections, you probably don’t get much face time with your members. And these individuals who are already inundated with email, direct mail and other marketing messages could be missing key information about your organization. The annual conference is the perfect opportunity to connect with members and remind them of the benefits of their membership. Find ways to include member touchpoints as part of the conference agenda and use them as an opportunity to educate (or, re-educate) on member benefits.

  1. New members: welcome them early and often

Many organizations provide special programming for new members or first-time attendees at the conference, such as a welcome reception. But walking into this reception can be a bit overwhelming and intimidating for a newbie. What if you could put them at ease and make them feel like an important member of the organization before the conference starts?  Consider hosting a pre-show virtual meet-and-greet with fellow peers. Introduce them to some of the conference speakers and key staff. Create conference liaisons to help break the ice and facilitate introductions while at the conference. This small extra step will go a long way toward creating a positive on-site experience.

There is a strong connection between a successful conference and association membership growth. The notoriety of your conference is what helps to attract new members, and it’s how existing members engage with your organization. Conference and membership teams need to work together to leverage this relationship to provide increase member benefit and attract new audiences.

CATALYST® Abstract Management Software Updates and Exciting New Features

 

In 2016 Omnipress launched CATALYST® abstract and speaker management software, an extremely flexible, highly configurable and user-friendly event content collection tool.  Designed to remove the most common challenges and frustrations of managing a call for papers, CATALYST 1.0 combined customer input with decades of our own experiences and observations working with associations and meeting planners.  Since its initial launch, we have maintained an aggressive investment in product development to ensure that CATALYST continues to exceed the expectations of today’s conference planner.  We are excited to announce some of our latest enhancements.

CATALYST is now three event tools in one: Abstract Management, Project Management and Content Management

Simplify your workload. CATALYST offers meeting planners more than abstract management—it helps you manage all conference content—from your initial call for submissions to your final, attendee-facing materials. Newest software updates include:

  • A built-in content management system to serve as the central hub for all final digital and print conference materials. Your accepted digital content and event schedule can be directly published to your website, to offline digital materials such as a downloadable file or USB, or to your Attendify® mobile event app. Make real-time updates on-site if your schedule changes
  • Improvements to the scheduling tool, with an improved interface and enhanced conflict detection parameters
  • Payment collection, to generate additional revenue and ensure you’re receiving only the highest-quality submissions

Event Schedule Software

More software integrations and partnerships connect CATALYST to the growing event tech world

Each year we continue to build an ever-expanding network of cross-platform integrations and industry partnerships designed to enhance the value you get from CATALYST.  We now integrate with many of the major association management systems, as well as other third-party tools such as Authorize.net, Bluepay and iThenticate plagiarism detection software.

We have also formed partnerships with several industry-leading event tech companies to make CATALYST more accessible to organizations, including:

  • Community Brands: Tech Partner
  • ACGI/Association Anywhere: Gold Partner
  • Fuzion: Network Member
  • Conference Direct: Preferred Supplier

Continuous improvement is our standard

In addition to these enhancements, we are continually making improvements and updates to CATALYST based on customer input and new technology developments. Our investment in ongoing development supports our commitment to ensuring that CATALYST continues to provide an easy experience for submitters and reviewers, while simplifying your workload.

Interested in seeing what’s new? Schedule a personalized tour of CATALYST.

Event Technology Software Integration: Is It Really Needed?

 

Over the past several years we have seen a significant increase in the number of customers that ask us about integrating CATALYST® Abstract Management System by Omnipress with their Association Management System (AMS). This probably comes as no surprise, as event technology integration is a hot topic in the meetings industry right now. Meeting planners are looking for ways to simplify processes for both attendees and staff while gathering smarter insights about their event. At Omnipress, we’ve developed CATALYST to integrate with many third-party technologies, including your AMS, and are continually working to increase our software integration footprint. We want to be sure that integration is an option for our customers when necessary. But integration–not just with an abstract management system, but with nearly any type of cross-platform connection–often requires more time and resources than meeting planners are prepared for. Before embarking down the integration path, it’s extremely important to have a clear understanding of your objectives and desired outcomes, to evaluate whether or not integration is truly necessary.

Integrating Your Event Technology Planning Tools

The event technology landscape is overwhelmingly diverse. Corbin Ball, a noted event technology expert, states that he currently tracks, “nearly 1,500 event tech products in 60 categories” on his website, ranging from comprehensive all-in-one platforms to smaller, more specialized tools. The benefit of an all-in-one platform is that, in theory, all products within the platform seamlessly integrate with each other. But many organizations find that not all tech products available within a single platform meet their specialized needs uniformly. As a result, they opt to build a “tech stack” of separate, best-in-breed products that can (hopefully) connect data from one system to the other seamlessly.  Recognizing this need, more and more technology providers are building cooperative relationships to ensure their products “play well” together.

The case for integration makes perfect sense. As a meeting planner, why wouldn’t you want to have the option to choose tools that work best for your specific organizational needs, and the convenience of a streamlined way to capture, track and manage data between them?

CATALYST® Abstract Management Software AMS Integration Instances

Below are the most common AMS integration use cases we see customers taking advantage of with CATALYST:

Single sign-on

If a member already has login credentials to access their account details or resources based on their member profile and status, those same credentials can be used to log in to CATALYST. This makes the process of submitting abstracts more convenient and simpler for users.

Access and content control

With AMS integration, organizations can use data such as member level, member status or payment transactions to control access to online educational materials. Additionally, meeting planners and program managers can control whether a member has permission to submit an abstract, or even which questions they see on the submission form.

Data consistency

Pull member data from your AMS into CATALYST and simplify the submission process for an author, preventing them from having to re-type data that already exists in the system. With AMS integration there’s also less room for human data entry error, increasing data cleanliness and accuracy.

Co-author data entry

Many abstracts or papers are submitted by one author, on behalf of a team of co-authors who are also members of the organization. Data integration can allow that author to easily look up co-author information from the AMS and have it auto-populate into the abstract submission form, increasing convenience and data integrity.

While it’s clear to see the inherent benefits of integration, many associations don’t always realize is the ongoing investment of time, budget and resources that will be required for optimal integration—particularly if your requirements are fairly complex and custom. Sean Lawler, Product Development Manager at Omnipress, points out, “If we have already integrated with a particular AMS or other database provider before, it does simplify the process, as we are already familiar with their back-end environment.” But, he cautions, “The real wild card is that almost every client has their AMS configured differently, so every integration is somewhat unique and adjustments have to be made.”

Organizations also need to think beyond just the initial build. “It’s not a ‘one-and-done’ situation,” says Lawler. “The integration often needs to be maintained as you make changes to your database.”

Is Event Technology Software Integration Important to Your Organization? 

Unfortunately, there is no “simple button” to push to make integration happen, no matter how technologically advanced the product is, nor how experienced the provider. Given the resources required, the real question for meeting planners is whether the ROI truly makes sense.  To help in your evaluation, here are just a sampling of the questions Sean and his team explore with customers before settling on integration options.

1. What current challenges or pain points are you trying to solve, and why?

In some cases, we’ve found that data integration was not the core of the issue. Instead, we worked with customers to address and improve aspects of their submission and review process, which helped to reduce and streamline the work involved.

2. By solving these challenges, what is the estimated net gain to your organization—time, labor, financial, etc.?

It’s important to understand the true impact of integration to help calculate the short and long-term ROI for the organization.

3. How often, or how real-time do you need to access the data?

If there truly is a need to see data on an ongoing basis or in real-time, then integration probably is your best option. Sometimes, customers indicate they only need data at the very end of the project. In these cases, we can often provide the data they need, at no additional cost to them.

4. Where are you in the current lifecycle of your AMS? Are you planning on making a switch in the next 1-2 years or making a major change or upgrade within your existing system?

If you foresee any major changes on the horizon, then we recommend delaying the integration conversation until that time if possible, because the work that is done the first time will likely have to be done all over again once the changes are implemented.

There’s no doubt that increased visibility, streamlined processes and consistent data provide significant benefits to meeting planners. Integration of your organization’s event technology is one way to achieve this. But depending upon your true needs and goals, it may be possible to implement more practical processes that achieve the same results, without the necessary timeline and investment of integration. It’s important to ensure all stakeholders are aligned on objectives and outcomes and come to the table with an open mind. There is no doubt that integration will continue to play a large role in the future of event technology, including CATALYST Abstract Management System, but it may or may not be the best option for your organization today.

Download Our 2019 Conference Industry Report

 

We are excited to announce that our 2019 State of the Conference Industry Report: Delivering Educational Content has just been released! A new year is here and with it comes new challenges and opportunities for association and conference professionals.

For the fifth year in a row, Omnipress has tracked the evolution of conference content and the role it plays at an association’s annual event. While educational content continues to provide a significant amount of member value, this year’s report highlights some changes on the horizon: emerging themes, new challenges and increased opportunities for organizations.

Delivering Educational Content: Current Challenges and Future Opportunities

For instance, this year’s report indicates that meeting planners they are being asked to deliver conference content in more formats than ever before. On average, associations are providing content in 2.6 formats—up from 2.4 in 2018, and 2.1 in 2017. The most noted increase was in the number of respondents who are providing three and even four different content delivery methods for a single conference. The reason? Attendees have indicated this is what they want.

Conference demographics are more diverse than ever, with four generations now living concurrently in the workplace. Additionally, there are ways than ever for people to consume content, which is creating a diverse set of preferences that don’t always follow generational stereotypes.

While associations look for ways to provide device-agnostic content, budget does come into play—particularly with other internal stakeholders. Few meeting planners have the luxury—nor the bandwidth—to do it all, leading to some tough decisions.

Other conference industry trends from our 2019 report:

  • Association membership trends mirror conference attendance trends, which means membership and conference teams need to work together more closely to achieve organizational goals
  • While organizations are offering more content formats at the conference, there is still uncertainty on what the content mix will look like in the future
  • Emerging learning trends are starting to have an impact at the conference
  • Organizations have not yet fully addressed the needs of younger generations

The report compiles data from an online survey of 150 association and meeting professionals to understand how organizations use educational content to increase visibility, extend their value and reach new attendees.

The purpose of this report is not just to present the data, but to help facilitate a cross-team discussion on how to leverage your greatest asset—education—to advance your mission and achieve strategic goals.

Download the free report to read the full results, and use it to spark a conversation within your own organization.

Tips for Designing an Inspiring Conference Program Booklet

 

Your annual conference is so much more than an agenda of sessions, speakers and networking events. It’s an exciting, energized community of attendees, where innovative ideas are shared and new relationships are forged.  You go to great lengths to convey this excitement and energy on your event website and in your marketing and promotional materials. But the program booklet—as one of the last items checked off a meeting planner’s to-do list—often takes on a more practical and utilitarian format. This may be a huge missed opportunity.

One of the first interactions attendees have with your conference is with the program guide. This booklet, while providing all necessary logistical information for attendees, also sets the tone of the meeting, and helps the attendee prepare for what’s to come. How are you hoping to engage attendees at your event? Do you want them to actively participate in sessions and interact with the content? Collaborate with speakers and each other? Do you want to challenge them or pull them outside their comfort zone? The design of your program book can help promote and facilitate these objectives.

What Inspired Program Book Design Looks Like: An Example from ASAE

asae xdp program book 360 live media
Photo credit: 360 Live Media, www.360livemedia.com

We’d like to give a shout-out to ASAE’s newest conference, Xperience Design Project (xdp). This event for meeting planners focuses on helping attendees re-think their own meetings and find new and innovative ways to deliver educational content.  The branding and promotion of the event certainly communicated this. But as an attendee, I didn’t realize just how different this event was until I started paging through the program book when I first arrived.  I could tell immediately this was meant to be a fun, energizing meeting. This extraordinary program book, designed by 360 Live Media, included design elements such as non-linear text, bold typography, graphic cues and on-page interactive elements, the xdp program book made it clear I was being expected to actively participate in my own learning. I was excited to be there even before the first speaker took the podium.

The takeaway: it’s not just about delivering relevant information to attendees, it’s HOW that information is delivered. Challenge yourself to think about how you can present the schedule, session descriptions, speaker bios, etc., in a way that really makes a lasting impact on attendees and sets the tone for the event, getting them fired up before the first session.

Six Design Pro Tips for Your Conference Booklet

First and foremost, your program book needs to be easy for any attendee to navigate. Think of it as user experience (UX) for printed materials. Beyond that, here are six aspects of your booklet design to consider.

Font and Typography

There is a documented psychology behind font choices and how they trigger ideas and emotions. Serif fonts, such as Times New Roman, convey a feeling of class and heritage, making them appear formal. Sans serif fonts, like Arial and Helvetica, convey a straight-forward, simple and no-nonsense attitude. Modern fonts, like Futura, convey feelings of intelligence and chic style and have been reported to attract the attention of Millennials. The font choice you make throughout your program book should support the overall “vibe” of your meeting.

Also, don’t be afraid to go big and bold with font size in unexpected places. This is a great way to provide an assertion of key ideas and themes that attendees will expect to hear, gaining their buy-in before the meeting starts.

Color and positioning

Within your brand palette, do you have any secondary colors that provide an interesting contrast?  Use these colors to highlight key aspects of your meeting content, make a statement or direct attendees.

Iconography

Icons have emerged as a popular element of design, particularly on the web, because they provide quick and sometimes complex visual cues quickly while minimizing the amount of text needed. Incorporating iconography into your conference program booklet provides consistent visual cues throughout the book that help direct the reader.   Depending upon the icon style being used, you can interject a bit of whimsy to make a more formal-looking program book feel approachable and conversational.

Interactivity

One of the top trends in meeting design for the past several years has been providing a more interactive and collaborative approach to the learning process. Conferences are no longer a place for attendees to simply consume learning; they are active participants. Your conference booklet can help facilitate and promote this approach as well. Sure, providing dedicated pages to take notes is always handy, but can you take it a step further? Provide thought-provoking questions and space to answer them. Include short workbook-like activities in your program book. Or, give them a specific place to take notes about people they’ve met.

Maximize Branding Opportunities Wherever You Can

cesse conference program bookletOne of our own fan-favorite program books features a simple, but impactful change from the previous year—we happen to know this because they are also one of our customers. The Council of Engineering and Scientific Society Executives (CESSE) incorporated tabs in their book to make it easy for users to navigate. Taking it a step further, they used what is often blank space to extend their event branding. The flood of bold color and graphics on what is traditionally a blank page helped to reinforce the perception that this is a high-quality, professional conference.

Find Inspiration Outside of Your Industry

Some of the most cutting-edge event designs come from cutting-edge conferences, such as Adobe’s 99U and the Facebook Developer Conference. Take a look at how they are presenting program information and then see how you might be able to scale the execution to fit your audience.

Your conference booklet can—and should—do more than simply provide logistical information. By incorporating a more inspirational design you can help shape the attendee experience well before the opening session begins.

Use SEO to Increase the ROI of Your Online Conference Materials

 

Perhaps the most valuable asset an association provides to its members is the educational content shared at a conference. In an effort to make that content more accessible, many organizations post their conference materials online. However, often times the content posted is limited to conference attendees who are looking for papers, presentations and handouts from sessions they already attended. While your current conference attendees certainly appreciate this, this limited approach does little to reach new audiences. By incorporating some simple SEO (search engine optimization) tips into your online conference content strategy, associations can drastically increase the role, value and ROI of your conference.

Why SEO for Online Conference Materials Matters

As associations look to increase their relevancy in a world that is changing faster than ever, many are thinking about how to attract and engage younger members. Capitalizing on the younger generation’s tendency to turn to search engines for answers to their most common questions is one logical place to start.

In 2012, the Pew Research Center conducted an online survey of middle and high school teachers to understand which tools were most often used for research projects. 94% of respondents indicated that their students were very likely to use Google as their primary source of research.  Today, these students are the very same Millennials and Gen Z-ers your organization is looking to attract. They are conditioned to turn to search engines like Google for the information and knowledge your association already provides. Learning how to optimize your online conference content so it shows up at the top of search results will help increase your content’s reach and influence, and ultimately your association’s thought leadership and industry influence.

How to Optimize Your Conference Materials for Search: 3 Simple Steps

SEO can often be a daunting task for associations who already have limited internal resources. After all, some large companies dedicate entire teams to the discipline. But, according to Casey Emanuel, Search Optimization Manager at Rocket Clicks, a specialized SEO agency and Premier Google Partner based in Milwaukee, WI, most associations would benefit drastically from adding just a few, simple tasks to their annual conference to-do list.

1. Add Metadata to Your PDFs

Most conference materials—from speaker presentations to handouts—are posted online as PDFs. Emanuel points out that, “just like web pages, you can, and should, optimize PDFs for searchability.” If done correctly, Google will crawl your PDFs for content, and can even display them as organic search results. These steps should only take a few minutes per PDF. To avoid doing all the work yourself, make it a required part of your final submission process.

  • Save the PDF to your website with a descriptive, SEO-friendly filename
  • In Acrobat Reader, go to File > Document Properties and fill in the Title and Subject fields with descriptive text and keywords
  • Optimize the file size by compressing any large images, if necessary

2. Build Quality Backlinks to Your Conference Materials

Backlinks, or references from third-party websites to your own, can serve as a signal of quality and authority to Google. However, Emanuel is quick to point out that, “These links need to be real and authentic, otherwise you could actually be penalized by search engines.”

One fairly easy way to build backlinks to your conference content is to encourage your speakers to reference and link to the material within their own online properties. Not only does this boost SEO for your organization, it also helps the speaker increase their own authority and visibility.

3. Build Internal Links to Your Conference Materials

Oftentimes, the only place you’ll find reference to online conference materials is within the Agenda or Schedule page of the conference website. Emanuel recommends creating follow-up articles or blog posts on popular session topics and incorporating links to the conference materials as part of the article. “These internal links work to build link authority just like backlinks do, helping your PDF files appear in search results for relevant keywords.” To help mitigate additional work, ask your speakers and session leaders to craft the article. They will love the additional exposure, and you’ll have one less post-conference task to complete.

Posting your conference materials online does more than just provide increased choice and accessibility for current attendees. If these materials are search engine optimized, they can deliver valuable answers to new audiences, increasing both the reach and ROI of your conference.

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